Enjoying the sun, sand and surf at South Padre Island with his wife, Norma and their children, Giselle and Sebastian, BPUB Regulatory Compliance Specialist Juan R. Carrizales says that’s why his work matters.  Clean air and water are important to him personally and professionally.

All utilities, including the Brownsville Public Utilities Board (BPUB), are controlled by state and federal regulations.  Carrizales reports on BPUB’s approved water and wastewater facility permits which define safe drinking water, appropriate wastewater treatment and air emissions monitoring.  The reports correlate with how operations impact the environment.

Carrizales, has an academic background in chemical technology from Texas State Technical College in Harlingen and a bachelor degree in chemistry from the University of Texas – Brownsville (now the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley).  He says the education and the experience he acquired as a laboratory technician and quality assurance specialist made him familiar with Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and Environmental Protection Agency procedures, rules and limits. He is also part of a team that assembles the annual Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) regarding water quality that is released to BPUB customers in May.

“Regulatory compliance makes sure we take the necessary steps to comply with laws and regulations for environmental safety,” Carrizales says. “It is satisfying knowing that I am part of an organization working together in order to provide safe and necessary utility services for our community to grow and prosper.”

Asked about how he thinks the future of renewable energy might impact regulatory compliance, Carrizales said that despite the move to cleaner energy, he does not foresee the development of utility regulations easing or maintaining the status quo.

“I think that there will be more regulations being implemented in the coming years in order to continue improving the environment and the safety of the public,” he said.

With new regulations appearing on the horizon, Carrizales says it’s his job to adapt, be informed and prepared for changes.

“You never stop learning,” he said. “You have to be up to date with upcoming environmental regulations and legislative issues concerning existing and future facilities, to determine their respective impacts on current and future operations. Sometimes you end up with more questions than answers. You learn something new every day.”

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